You asked: How do I create a link to a folder in Linux?

Ln Command to Create Symbolic Links

  1. By default, the ln command creates a hard link.
  2. Use the -s option to create a soft (symbolic) link.
  3. The -f option will force the command to overwrite a file that already exists.
  4. Source is the file or directory being linked to.

Browse until you find the specific file, folder, or library for which you want the direct link. Hold down Shift on your keyboard and right-click on the file, folder, or library for which you want a link. Then, select “Copy as path” in the contextual menu.

To create a symbolic link pass the -s option to the ln command followed by the target file and the name of link. In the following example a file is symlinked into the bin folder. In the following example a mounted external drive is symlinked into a home directory.

Replace source_file with the name of the existing file for which you want to create the symbolic link (this file can be any existing file or directory across the file systems). Replace myfile with the name of the symbolic link. The ln command then creates the symbolic link.

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Soft links are similar to shortcuts, and can point to another file or directory in any file system. Hard links are also shortcuts for files and folders, but a hard link cannot be created for a folder or file in a different file system. Let’s look at the steps involved in creating and removing a symlink.

A hard link is a file that points to the same underlying inode, as another file. In case you delete one file, it removes one link to the underlying inode. Whereas a symbolic link (also known as soft link) is a link to another filename in the filesystem.

To create a link to an existing local file, perform these tasks:

  1. Highlight the text (or image) that you would like to turn into a link.
  2. Click the Create Hyperlink icon (Figure) in the toolbar. …
  3. Select Link to a file.
  4. Click Next. …
  5. Select Existing local file, and click Next.

Click on the Upload File icon in your Content Editor Toolbar.

  1. Select your file from your computer or the Media Library in your account. …
  2. Add Link Text for the file and click Save. …
  3. Your article text will be updated to include your link text which links directly to your file.
  4. Click Save to save the changes to your article.

Link to other parts in your file

  1. Select what you’d like to turn into a link and then select Insert > Hyperlink or press Ctrl + K.
  2. Select Place in This Document.
  3. Choose where you’d like the link to connect to and select OK.
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To view the symbolic links in a directory:

  1. Open a terminal and move to that directory.
  2. Type the command: ls -la. This shall long list all the files in the directory even if they are hidden.
  3. The files that start with l are your symbolic link files.

A symbolic link contains a text string that is automatically interpreted and followed by the operating system as a path to another file or directory. This other file or directory is called the “target”. The symbolic link is a second file that exists independently of its target.

The reason hard-linking directories is not allowed is a little technical. Essentially, they break the file-system structure. You should generally not use hard links anyway. Symbolic links allow most of the same functionality without causing problems (e.g ln -s target link ).

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