How do I reduce root partition in Linux?

Can we reduce root partition in Linux?

Resizing a root partition is tricky. In Linux, there isn’t a way to actually resize an existing partition. One should delete the partition and re-create a new partition again with the required size in the same position.

How do I shrink a root partition?

Select the root partition you want to resize. In this case, we only have one partition that belongs to the root partition, so we choose to resize it. Press the Resize/Move button to resize the selected partition. Enter the size that you want to take out from this partition in the first box.

How do I free up root space in Linux?

Freeing disk space on your Linux server

  1. Get to the root of your machine by running cd /
  2. Run sudo du -h –max-depth=1.
  3. Note which directories are using a lot of disk space.
  4. cd into one of the big directories.
  5. Run ls -l to see which files are using a lot of space. Delete any you don’t need.
  6. Repeat steps 2 to 5.

How do I change the root partition in Linux?

Configuration

  1. Mount your destination drive (or partition).
  2. Run the command “gksu gedit” (or use nano or vi).
  3. Edit the file /etc/fstab. Change the UUID or device entry with the mount point / (the root partition) to your new drive. …
  4. Edit the file /boot/grub/menu. lst.
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How do I change partition size in Linux?

To resize a partition:

  1. Select an unmounted partition. See the section called “Selecting a Partition”.
  2. Choose: Partition → Resize/Move. The application displays the Resize/Move /path-to-partition dialog.
  3. Adjust the size of the partition. …
  4. Specify the alignment of the partition. …
  5. Click Resize/Move.

What is root partition in Linux?

Root: Non-swap partition where the filesystem goes and required to boot a Linux system. Home: Holds user and configuration files separate from the operating system files. Swap: When the system runs out of RAM, the operating system moves inactive pages from RAM into this partition.

How do I allocate more space to my root partition?

3 Answers

  1. Open GParted.
  2. Right click on /dev/sda11 and select Swapoff.
  3. Right click on /dev/sda11 and select Delete.
  4. Click on Apply All Operations.
  5. Open a terminal.
  6. Extend the root partition: sudo resize2fs /dev/sda10.
  7. Go back to GParted.
  8. Open the GParted menu and click on Refresh Devices.

How much space does a root partition need?

Root partition (always required)

Description: the root partition contains by default all your system files, program settings and documents. Size: minimum is 8 GB. It is recommended to make it at least 15 GB.

Can I resize Linux partition from Windows?

Do not touch your Windows partition with the Linux resizing tools! … Now, right click on the partition you want to change, and choose Shrink or Grow depending on what you want to do. Follow the wizard and you’ll be able to safely resize that partition.

How do I manage disk space in Linux?

How to Check and Manage Disk Space in Linux

  1. df – This reports the amount of disk space on a system.
  2. du – This shows the amount of space used by specific files.
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How do I resolve disk space in Linux?

How to free disk space on Linux systems

  1. Checking free space. More about open source. …
  2. df. This is the most basic command of all; df can display free disk space. …
  3. df -h. [root@smatteso-vm1 ~]# df -h. …
  4. df -Th. …
  5. du -sh * …
  6. du -a /var | sort -nr | head -n 10. …
  7. du -xh / |grep ‘^S*[0-9. …
  8. find / -printf ‘%s %pn’| sort -nr | head -10.

How do I clean up Linux?

The 10 Easiest Ways to Keep Ubuntu System Clean

  1. Uninstall Unnecessary Applications. …
  2. Remove Unnecessary Packages and Dependencies. …
  3. Clean Thumbnail Cache. …
  4. Remove Old Kernels. …
  5. Remove Useless Files and Folders. …
  6. Clean Apt Cache. …
  7. Synaptic Package Manager. …
  8. GtkOrphan (orphaned packages)
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